Archive for the ‘Digital storytelling’ Category

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Monday, September 26th, 2011

The storyteller details an early memory of tobacco use and how she draws personal strength from her Native American background. The video was produced in a three-day workshop held at Denver-based Sisters of Color United for Education in March 2011.

The video was produced for the research project “Tobacco control and digital storytelling: Collaborative videography with Latino adults to promote health equity among Colorado Latinos” (#09-0099). The purpose of the project is to equip Latino adults with media literacy and video production skills for creating their own digital stories based on health narratives aimed at increasing the leadership capacity of Latino adults.

Funds for the project provided by the UC Denver Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program, and the Colorado Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute at the University of Colorado.

Krystle Alirez, Monica Fullmer and Hannah Nichols- 2010-11 UROP/CCTSI Award Recipients and Co-Principal Investigators.

Hidden Voice

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Digital story about a father’s smoking habit and his son’s reflection on how tobacco use threatens health and family. The video was produced in a three-day workshop held at Denver-based Sisters of Color United for Education in March 2011.

The video was produced for the research project “Tobacco control and digital storytelling: Collaborative videography with Latino adults to promote health equity among Colorado Latinos” (#09-0099). The purpose of the project is to equip Latino adults with media literacy and video production skills for creating their own digital stories based on health narratives aimed at increasing the leadership capacity of Latino adults.

Funds for the project provided by the UC Denver Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program, and the Colorado Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute at the University of Colorado.

Krystle Alirez, Monica Fullmer and Hannah Nichols- 2010-11 UROP/CCTSI Award Recipients and Co-Principal Investigators.

Viral Hepatitis Digital Stories

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

The digital stories created by participants in the research project “Digital Health Stories: Video Interventions for Hepatitis C in Colorado” (protocol #11-0243) are ready for viewing at the web link below. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is the project funder. For more information, contact CDPHE’s Viral Hepatitis Program, 303 692 2780; hepatitiscolorado.info

After you watch one or more of the videos (average length for each video is 3 minutes), we invite you to complete a 10-minute survey. The survey is the same for each digital story. We will use the information obtained from the survey research to understand the influence of digital health stories on viewers’ perceptions of hepatitis and on hepatitis prevention.

Please forward the digital stories and survey to individuals you may know who are affected with hepatitis, completed treatment for hepatitis, have a family member or close friend infected with hepatitis, or have experience in hepatitis awareness.

Sample image from the survey is below.

betsy bug

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Video about family relationships and mental health issues. Produced by Wanda Lakota in a digital storytelling workshop in Denver, Colorado, May 2010, as part of the research project “Tobacco Control and Digital Storytelling: Collaborative Videography with Latino Adults to Promote Health Equity Among Colorado Latinos.”

Marty Otañez, Principal Investigator and Assistant Professor
Anthropology Department, University of Colorado Denver

(marty[dot]otanez[at]ucdenver[dot]edu)

Funds provided by
University of Colorado Latino/a Research and Policy Center

Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute

Faded Jeans

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

In summer 2009, I lived in an all-male safehouse in Tijuana, Mexico where I conducted ethnographic fieldwork on the individual experience of deportation. “Faded Jeans” is about my personal experience as a Latina woman framed in the theory of feminist ethnography.

Analisia Stewart, Producer
Medical Anthropology graduate student
University of Colorado, Denver
analisia.stewart@email.ucdenver.edu

Course Project
Current Theory in Ethnography
Marty Otañez, Instructor, Fall 2010

A Medical Gaze

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

This visual narrative explores the social consequences of the U.S. medical system’s business incentive to utilize the body as capital gain. The video utilizes visual ethnography, critical theory, applied ethnography and reflexive narrative to demonstrate the U. S. mainstream medical community’s objectification of “bodies” as resource and disregard of individual preference through “medical gaze”.

Michel Foucault concepts of “body” and “medical gaze” are utilized in this video to highlight that by entering the field of knowledge, the human body concurrently entered the field of power, becoming a target for manipulation. In this instance, visual/critical ethnography is utilized to motivate “consumers” to exercise self-determination in the management of their healthcare. Shared knowledge surrounding the body in healthcare means shared power, particularly surrounding the amount/quality of life care in relation to classic biomedical criteria.

B. Alex McKeon, Producer
Medical Anthropology M.A. Student
University of Colorado Denver
Brittany.McKeon@ucdenver.edu

Course Project
Current Theory in Ethnography
Marty Otañez, Instructor, Fall 2010

Paleoanthropology’s Science Fallacy

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

Paleoanthropology is depicted as a discipline that relies extremely heavily on science, often omitting cultural and reflexive frameworks from its research. When reflexive theories that are more commonly found in ethnography are used, the limited body of data can be more accurately interpreted.

Andrew Vorsanger, Producer
Anthropology Graduate Student
University of Colorado, Denver
Andrew.Vorsanger@gmail.com

Course Project
Current Theory in Ethnography
Marty Otañez, Instructor, Fall 2010

A FIELD

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

“A Field” is centered on the narratives of individuals from the Middle East that are involved with Seeds of Peace International, a conflict-resolution organization. The video highlights the story of Tamara—a young Palestinian girl from a refugee camp in Jenin—as she shares her background and meets individuals from the ‘other side’ of her conflict for the first time. The video is framed with anthropological theories of a field and habitus as well as consideration of an ethnographic field as a conceptual space.

Sarah Norton, Producer
Medical Anthropology graduate student
University of Colorado, Denver
colosaran@gmail.com

Course Project, Current Theory in Ethnography
Marty Otañez, Instructor, Fall 2010

Visualizing Health and Gender Equity: Views from Tobacco Fields in Kenya (Free Workshop 24 Feb 2011)

Thursday, February 17th, 2011

Women for Justice in Africa and Marty Otañez, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado Denver, have organized a free side event at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW 2011).

The event- a workshop- is called “Visualizing Health and Gender Equity: Views from Tobacco Fields in Kenya,” and will show participants how to use imagery and digital storytelling techniques to advance women and children rights. We will integrate maternal health issues and the experiences of child labourers on tobacco farms in Kenya and show brief social documentaries developed after visits to Kenya’s tobacco farms in January 2011.

The free workshop is scheduled from 2.30-4.30 pm on Thursday 24 February 2011. The venue is Hess Commons, Ground Floor, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Parking is available in Washington Heights. The subway stop is 168th Street (lines A, C, 1).

For more details email marty.otanez@ucdenver.edu if you have have questions or need clarification.

To confirm participation, please send a blank email to wojacsweventonfeb24@yahoo.com

Click image below to view event flyer

[an.dro.gyne]

Monday, December 6th, 2010

RC, Vis Anth UCD, Fall 2010 (updated 6 Dec 2010)